It’s getting hot in here…

pexels-photo-480072Summer is here. It’s time to enjoy the outdoors. Whether you hike, swim, or just lay out, it’s important you learn about what happens when your body gets too hot.

How much do you know about heat stress?

Heat stress is heat-related illness caused by your body’s inability to cool down properly. The body normally cools itself by sweating. But under some conditions, sweating just isn’t enough. In such cases, a person’s body temperature rises rapidly. Very high body temperatures may damage the brain or other vital organs…and can even cause death!

Know the signs of heat illness.

Heat Cramps.

What to look for? 

  • Heavy sweating during intense exercise
  • Muscle pain or spasms

What to do?

  • Stop physical activity and move to a cool place
  • Drink water or a sports drink
  • Wait for cramps to go away before you do any more physical activity

Heat Exhaustion.

What to look for?

  • Heavy sweating
  • Cold, pale, and clammy skin
  • Fast, weak pulse
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Muscle cramps
  • Feeling tired or weak
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Headache
  • Fainting (passing out)

What to do?

  • Move to a cool place
  • Loosen your clothes
  • Put cool, wet cloths on your body or take a cool bath
  • Sip water

Heat Stroke. Can cause death!

What to look for?

  • High body temperature (103°F or higher)
  • Hot, red, dry, or damp skin
  • Fast, strong pulse
  • Headache
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Nausea
  • Feeling confused
  • Losing consciousness (passing out)

What to do?

  • Call 911 right away- heat stroke is a medical emergency
  • Move the person to a cooler place
  • Help lower the person’s temperature with cool cloths or a cool bath
  • Do not give the person anything to drink

Pay close attention to children and pets!

Never leave kids or pets in a parked car!

  • Even when it feels cool outside, cars can heat up to dangerous temperatures very quickly.
  • Leaving a window open is not enough- temperatures inside the car can rise almost 20 degrees Fahrenheit within the first 10 minutes, even with a window cracked open.
  • Children and pets who are left unattended in parked cars are at greatest risk for heat stroke, and possibly death.

pexels-photo-236452

For more information, please visit: https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/index.html

 

 

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